Effect of Growth Hormone Therapy on IGF-I, Bone GLA-Protein and Bone Mineral Content in Short Children with and without Chronic Renal Failure Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Chronic renal failure (CRF) in the young is complicated by, among other conditions, growth retardation, hyperparathyroidism and uremic osteodystrophy. Many children with CRF are now being treated with growth hormone (GH). Since GH has a direct mitogenic effect on osteoblasts in culture, we studied the effects of GH therapy on osteoblastic activity, such as serum alkaline phosphatase (AP), bone GLA-protein (BGP) and bone mass density (BMD) in poorly growing children with and without CRF. Fifteen (4 girls, 11 boys) healthy children with short stature (SS) and 10 (3 girls, 7 boys) children with end-stage renal failure (CRF) 4.5-12.4 years of age were treated with daily subcutaneous injections of GH in a dose of 0.1-0.125 IU/kg/day for 1 year. IGF-I, BGP and BMD of the spine were determined before and after the year of treatment. During GH therapy, a similar increase in height velocity and IGF-I were noted in SS and CRF groups: 3.8 +/- 0.77 to 8.38 +/- 1.25 (p < 0.001) vs. 4.0 +/- 0.6 to 7.14 +/- 1.3 cm/year (p < 0.001) and 7.8 +/- 2.6 to 21.8 +/- 7.5 (p < 0.01) vs. 7.9 +/- 1.3 to 21.5 +/- 5.6 nmol/l (p < 0.01), respectively. AP increased from 205 +/- 27 to 274 +/- 50 IU/l (p < 0.01) in the SS group but not in CRF patients (223 +/- 58 pre- 218 +/- 51 IU/l post-GH therapy).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • January 1, 1992