ENERGY PRODUCTION IN BIOFUEL CELLS Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Ken Nealson, University of Southern California and the J. Craig Venter Institute, specializes in research on microbial physiology and genomics, environmental microbiology, metagenomics of natural populations, and microbial fuel cells. At the workshop, Nealson focused on electromicrobiology, the Shewanella organism, and some of the lessons he and his group learned from studying microbial fuel cells.“Electrons must flow,” said Nealson. Electron flow is essential to life, and electron donors and electron acceptors define the thermodynamic range over which microbiology happens in our planet. The energy from electron flow is used to drive reactions of life. The geological environment supplies many oxidants and reductants that life has learned to utilize (Figure 2-10). For example, a methanogen does not have a lot of energy; in

publication date

  • March 13, 2012