Friction stir welded AM50 and AZ31 Mg alloys: Microstructural evolution and improved corrosion resistance Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • One of the major drawbacks of Mg alloys is poor weldability, caused by porosity formation during conventional fusion welding processes. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is promising technique in this context since it is a solid state technique. Contradicting results were published in the literature regarding the FSWed Mg alloys joint's properties. Current research was performed in order to investigate the microstructure and corrosion properties of FSWed Mg alloys, studying representatives of two commercial families: wrought AZ31-H24 and die cast AM50. It was found that in both alloys recrystallization occurred during the FSW. In AM50 the mechanism of the recrystallization was continuous, manifested by dislocation rearrangement into sub grain boundaries. In AZ31 discontinuous recrystallization had occurred through grain boundaries migration - twins rotated with respect to the matrix, turning into low angle grain boundaries. Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extents. In the AM50 alloy, the nugget exhibited significantly higher surface potential than the base metal mainly due to the higher Al concentration in the matrix of the nugget, resulting from the dissolution of Al-enrichment and β-Mg17Al12 phase. In the AZ31 alloy, no change in Al concentration had occurred, and the surface potential measured in the nugget was only slightly higher than in the base metal. These results underline the appropriateness of the FSW for Mg alloys since during the conventional welding deterioration of the corrosion resistance occurs.

publication date

  • January 1, 2017