Decision making in acquiring medical technologies in Israeli medical centers: A preliminary study Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Objectives: This preliminary study had two objectives: a) charting the considerations relevant to decisions about acquisition of new medical technology at the hospital level; and b) creating a basis for the development of a research tool that will examine the function of the Israeli health system in assessment of new medical technologies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and in-depth interviews with decision makers at different levels allowed formulation of criteria considered by decision makers when they decide to purchase and use (or disallow the use) of new medical technology. The resulting questionnaire was sent to medical center directors, along with a letter explaining the goals of the study. The questionnaire included 31 possible considerations for decision making concerning the acquisition of new medical technology by medical centers. The interviewees were asked to indicate the relevance of each consideration in the decision-making process. Results: The most relevant criteria for the adoption of new technologies related to the need for a large capital investment, clinical efficacy of the technology as well as its influence on side effects and complication rates, and a formal approval by the Ministry of Health. Most interviewees stated that pressures exerted by the industry, by patients, or by senior physicians in the hospital are less relevant to decision making. Very small and usually not statistically significant differences in the ranking of hospital directors were found according to the hospitals' ownership, size, or location. Conclusions: The present study is a basis for a future study that will map and describe the function of hospital decision makers within the area of new technology assessment and the decision-making process in the adoption of new healthcare technologies.

publication date

  • January 1, 2003