361 Topical Steroid Treatment for Suppression of Granulation Tissue in Burns: Results of a European Survey Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Introduction The presence of granulation tissue in burn wounds, especially hypergranulation, may negatively influence healing time and contribute to the development of hypertrophic scarring and contractures. Acceptable treatment methods include surgical excision, silver nitrate sticks, hypertonic saline and laser ablation. Topical corticosteroids have been reported to suppress the inflammatory response that contributes to the growth of granulation tissue however literature about this treatment in burn wounds is limited and of low level of evidence. The aim of this study was to explore trends in the use of topical corticosteroids for suppression of granulation tissue amongst burn care professionals. Methods Participants of the 17th European Burns Association Congress were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their experience with the use of topical corticosteroids for suppression of granulation tissue in burns. The survey included questions regarding the responders’ profession, years of experience, number of patients treated yearly, experience with the use of topical corticosteroids in wound and burn care, and questions related to the safety and efficacy of this treatment for those experienced with its use. Results Eighty-two questionnaires were completed by 61 physicians (74%) and 21 non-physicians (26%) with an average of 13.7 years of experience in burn care, and an average of 300 burn patients treated per year. Seventy-two (88%) practice in Europe. Sixty-three (77%) were experienced in the use of topical steroids for suppression of granulation tissue in burns. All of those experienced in the use of topical steroids for suppression of granulation tissue in burns found the treatment to be safe and effective. Forty-four (70%) estimated they treated up to 50 burn patients with topical steroids per year, and 19 (30%) estimated >50 patients per year. Only 1 of the 63 experienced responders (1.5%) witnessed a case of possible systemic side effects. Only 7 of the 63 (11%) experienced responders stated they had witnessed infections in <10% of the patients they treated with topical steroids (three in <1% of patients, three in 2–5% of patients, and one in 6–10% of patients). Conclusions The results of this survey demonstrate that the use of topical steroids for suppression of granulation tissue in burn care is surprisingly widespread despite a small amount of available literature on the subject. Additional surveys in other geographic regions are needed for comparison. Well controlled clinical studies are needed to confirm safety and efficacy of the use of topical steroids in this manner. Applicability of Research to Practice The use of topical steroids for suppression of granulation tissue in burn care appears to be safe and effective.

publication date

  • April 9, 2018