The impact of cognitive behavioral interventions on SOC, perceived stress and mood states of nurses Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Health care professionals are prone to continuous stress due to their occupational demands. Occupational stress is defined as a response to chronic job-related stress characterized by physical and emotional exhaustion and stress related disorders. Very few studies have examined the impact of cognitive behavioral interventions (CBI), including information provision and education on stress reactions among nurses. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of CBI on nurses’ sense of coherence (SOC), perceived stress, and mood states. A pre-post test design, with control, was chosen in order to meet the aims of the study. Participants consisted of thirty-six registered nurses. Nurses were recruited from all hospital wards by snowballing technique. Twenty nurses comprised the CBI group (study-group). A control group of sixteen nurses were matched by terms of age, education, and marital status. The psychological measures of the two groups were compared at baseline (t1) and did not differ with regard to their SOC, perceived stress, and mood states. Effect of group on psychological measure was carried out by analysis of covariance. The pre-post effects within each group controlling for t1 showed that in the CBI group, a statistically significant change was found in four of the psychological measures: the values of SOC and vigor mood state increased, while values of perceived stress and fatigue mood state significantly decreased at t2. No such changes were observed in the control-group. The results are discussed in the conceptual frame of stress and coping theory. Recommendations for health professionals’ education are suggested.

publication date

  • January 1, 2010