Nutritional Behavior as a Predictor of Early Success after Vertical Gastroplasty Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Background: Patients' nutritional habits are seldom taken in account in planning surgery for clinically severe obesity. Our proposed hypothesis is that the patient's nutritional behavior may influence the outcome of bariatric surgery. Methods: The impact of nutritional behavior on the postoperative weight-loss was evaluated before and after bariatric surgery. A 6-month prospective consecutive case study was carried out on patients undergoing a Silastic ring vertical gastroplasty (SRVG). Patients were interviewed and examined before and at 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. Demographic and clinical data were collected from the patients' medical charts. Nutritional data collected from a self-filled questionnaire included information on hunger and satiety perception, nutritional behavior (intake, eating habits and maximum consistency of consumed food) and concomitant symptoms. Results: The sample included 69 patients: 56 were women (81%); average age was 32 years (range 18 50). Average preoperative BMI was 43.4 ± 5.3 kg/m2 (range 35-58). 6 months after surgery, BMI was 30.3 ± 3.8 kg/m2 (range 21-42). Weight loss forecast models showed a statistically significant role of factors related to: anthropometrical preoperative data, hunger perception, prevalence of oral mucosal sore, and nutritional behavior. Conclusion: The short nutrition outcomes after gastric restrictive surgery were looked at, with their impact on weight-loss success. The Eating Status concept should be part of a systematic profiling of morbidly obese patients for preoperative nutritional behavior and postoperative nutritional education, to achieve the best comprehensive treatment in regard to weight loss and quality of life.

publication date

  • January 1, 2005