Reduced liver cell death using an alginate scaffold bandage: a novel approach for liver reconstruction after extended partial hepatectomy Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Extended partial hepatectomy may be needed in cases of large hepatic mass, and can lead to fulminant hepatic failure. Macroporous alginate scaffold is a biocompatible matrix which promotes the growth, differentiation and long-term hepatocellular function of primary hepatocytes in vitro. Our aim was to explore the ability of implanted macroporous alginate scaffolds to protect liver remnants from acute hepatic failure after extended partial hepatectomy. An 87% partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed on C57BL/6 mice to compare non-treated mice to mice in which alginate or collagen scaffolds were implanted after PH. Mice were scarified 3, 6, 24 and 48 h and 6 days following scaffold implantation and the extent of liver injury and repair was examined. Alginate scaffolds significantly increased animal survival to 60% vs. 10% in non-treated and collagen-treated mice (log rank = 0.001). Mice with implanted alginate scaffolds manifested normal and prolonged aspartate aminotransferases and alanine aminotransferases serum levels as compared with the 2- to 20-fold increase in control groups (P < 0.0001) accompanied with improved liver histology. Sustained normal serum albumin levels were observed in alginate-scaffold-treated mice 48 h after hepatectomy. Incorporation of BrdU-positive cells was 30% higher in the alginate-scaffold-treated group, compared with non-treated mice. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly decreased 3 h post PH. Biotin-alginate scaffolds were quickly well integrated within the liver tissue. Collectively, implanted alginate scaffolds support liver remnants after extended partial hepatectomy, thus eliminating liver injury and leading to enhanced animal survival after extended partial hepatectomy.

publication date

  • July 1, 2014