Urine flow rate monitoring in hypovolemic multiple trauma patients Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Background The urine output is an important clinical parameter of renal function and blood volume status, especially in critically ill multiple trauma patients. In the present study, the minute-to-minute urine flow rate and its variability were analyzed in hypotensive multiple trauma patients during the first 6 h of their ICU (intensive care unit) stay. These parameters have not been previously reported. Methods The study was retrospective and observational. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the computerized Register Information Systems. A total of 59 patients were included in the study. The patients were divided into two study groups. Group 1 consisted of 29 multiple trauma patients whose systolic blood pressure was greater than 90 mmHg on admission to the ICU and who were consequently deemed to be hemodynamically compromised. Group 2 consisted of 30 patients whose systolic blood pressure was less than 90 mmHg on admission to the ICU and who were therefore regarded as hemodynamically uncompromised. ResultsThe urine output and urine flow rate variability during the first 6 h of the patients’ ICU stay was significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p < 0.001 and 0.006 respectively). Statistical analysis by the Pearson method demonstrated a strong direct correlation between decreased urine flow rate variability and decreased urine output per hour (R = 0.17; P = 0.009), decreased mean arterial blood pressure (R = 0.24; p = 0.001), and increased heart rate (R = 0.205; p = 0.001). Conclusion These findings suggest that minute-to-minute urine flow rate variability is a reliable incipient marker of hypovolemia and that it should therefore take its place among the parameters used to monitor the hemodynamic status of critically ill multiple trauma patients.

publication date

  • January 1, 2017